“WE RUN TINGS, TINGS NUH RUN WE.” When a Jamaican utters these wordswhile beating his chest and with his head held high, be afraid… Be very afraid. These words are a cry of greatness, a prediction of victory or a warning to clear the way. These words are profoundly echoed in the actions and achievements of our people. As the sun rises on Jamaica’s 58th anniversary of Independence, there are those who exuberantly celebrate the green, black and gold, belting ‘Jamaica, Land We Love’ and taking the pledge “Before God and all mankind…” Holding these symbols close as an affirmation of pride and progress. Others feel that true independence remains elusive… that when the shackles of colonialism were removed, a more sinister neo-colonialism moved in to take its place… and that independence from the former ‘mother country’ was merely conditional or perhaps even a lie. Irrespective of political or ideological leaning, one thing is for sure— Jamaicans are some of the most independent people in the world. Here are six indisputable reminders that Jamaicans run tings, tings nuh run we… Food Out of many, one food. Not only did Jamaicans create their national cuisine by perfectly blending influences from the Caribbean, Europe, Africa and Asia but they take it everywhere they go. Jamaican restaurants are so popular that you can almost find one anywhere in the world and sometimes several of them on the same street! See Church Avenue (also called Bob Marley Blvd) in Brooklyn, New York if you don’t believe me. Food in these restaurants is so popular that enterprising Jamaicans are now charging extra for oxtail gravy! But wait! There’s more. As if one identifiable cuisine wasn’t enough, Jamaicans pioneered another globally recognized cuisine called ital. Created by the Jamaican Rastafarian community, this natural way of preparing food focuses on eating what comes straight from the earth and does not include meat. Music Speaking of the great Robert Nesta Marley, Jamaican independence is evident in the invention and migration of many globally recognized Jamaican genres of music. From Mento to Dancehall… just imagine, the same country that gave the world Count Lasher also gave it Kartel… Jamaica releases new music at a prolific pace daily and Jamaican artists are among the most sampled in the world. The up-tempo feel of Ska reflected the nation’s mood after independence and Reggae music was birthed out of political strife and socio-economic hardship. Jamaican music has been used to lead revolutions and to broker peace. Jamaicans move to the beat of their own drum and when we find a rhythm we like, we make the world move to it as well. Fashion/ Style Mesh marina, diamond socks, Clarks, Buffalino, Romper, batty rider and pum pum shorts. Even if they aren’t made in Jamaica these items have all became synonymous with Jamaican culture and fashion. For Jamaicans, it’s not just WHAT you wear its HOW you wear it. Jamaican swag is undeniable, with iconic accessories to boot. ‘Kerchief or a back pocket rag are staples for the look. If you are wondering how influential the look is, look no further than runways in Milan or the latest music videos. Rastafarian Culture Of course the same people who created multiple genres of music would also be the originators of an entire faith and movement. Regarded as one of the fastest growing faiths/movements in history, Rastafari focuses on clean eating and living in unity with the earth with a pure mind and body. Rastafarians in Jamaica give the island a central role in the ideologies surrounding repatriation and reparations for people of African descent around the world. Rastafari has also influenced much of the music that the world embraces— transcending race, class and nationality via the tunes of artistes such as Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Dennis Brown, Bunny Wailer, Garnet Silk, Chronixx, Protege and Autarchii, who are all Rastafarians. Language The Honourable Louise Bennett-Coverley reminded us that Jamaican patois is not a corruption of the English language but is its own beautiful language, created by our ancestors with influences that reflect Jamaica’s colourful past. Our highly emotive and assertive native tongue is recognized and loved the world over… chat bout! Aside from our traditional patois, the revolving door of Jamaican slang finds its way into global pop culture and even into the every day vernacular of cities around the world. Visit the party scene in Toronto and you’ll hear Canadians using the word bashment or the lads in England referring to themselves as rude bwoys. Dance Jamaicans export dance moves the way that the Japanese export cars. No doubt, Jamaicans love to dance, but creating, innovating and promoting dance moves has become its own industry and has proven to be quite lucrative for Jamaicans with nimble feet. The late Gerald Levy aka “Bogle” helped to make dancing synonymous with dancehall and paved the way for today’s dancers who teach foreigners the latest moves or even “fly out” on their own dancing tours around the world. International dance choreography and music videos are littered with dance moves created by Jamaicans in Jamaica. With social media as their platform, artists such as Ding Dong and the Ravers Clavers dance crew have ensured that this Jamaican dance trend is not just a passing fad. {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/RuQifNefeWw.jpg?itok=Gd-5fRpA","video_url":"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuQifNefeWw","settings":{"responsive":1,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":1},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (Responsive, autoplaying)."]} Ravers Clavers vibing to "Trending" by Squash If you remove the political lens it is not hard to see that this land we call Jamaica and all of her beautiful people have always had an independent spirit— forged by our interactions with other nationalities, our unique geography and through a variety of unique historical circumstances. Every Jamaican— home and abroad— is a part of the patchwork that makes the quilt of “Jamaicanness” that blankets the globe. “Wi likkle but wi talawah, yuh zeet.”

Cheek to Cheek with Shenelle Gardner. (Photos: Orville Spence)

Loop Lifestyleintroduces Cheek to Cheek, a series of images created by Jamaican creatives, comprising a make-up artist, a photographer, a creative director, and a model/s. Expect to see vibrant artistry that is as thought-provoking as it is inspirational. Each week is different. From the make-up artist to concept and from model to location; it’s all intended to leave you in awe of the varying interpretations of Jamaican Beauty. Enjoy! What comes to mind when you think of Jamaican Avant-Garde? Well, for 23-year-old make-up artist Shenelle Gardner, avant-garde make-up involves ‘adding cultural expression’. This is a feature of the stunning images you’ll see in the Jamaica Mi Born & Glo-titled editorial below. [image_gallery] Loop Lifestyle (LL): What inspired the look, and why? Shenelle Gardner (SG):A combination of the vibrancy of Jamaican culture and the colours of our land was a starting point for me. I knew I wanted to do a male and female shoot but how to execute it however proved a challenge for me, initially. After a few attempts and practising several techniques on colour application to the face at the University ofYouTube, Shenelle found the formula! ‘Whenever I am creating a look, I’ve learnt to picture the end first – I think of what I want to achieve then figure out how to make it work.’ LL: Describe your idea of Jamaican avant-garde. SG:Avant-garde to me is taking life and transforming it into art; it is not defined or restricted to one particular idea or demographic, but instead, is spontaneity and true freedom of expression with no rules or expectations, while ensuring my signature is consistent in every work I produce. Jamaican Avant-garde, for Shenelle, is really just adding cultural expression. ‘It is being genuine to who I am and my interpretation of what Jamaica means to me. I love to use old and new techniques to bring a [concept] to life.' LL: List your top four tools of the trade. SG:1 Make-up brushes 2 Brush cleaner with a high alcohol concentrate 3 Disposable makeup wedges 4 Spatula and palette LL: List two make-up artists that you follow incessantly. SG:I watch Danessa Myricks and Alexandra Anele religiously. LL: What is your go-to product, and why? SG:My favourite products are eyeshadows because they are multipurpose. Any palette that contains hues of brown and orange is my utmost favourite. LL: List five products you swear by. SG:1 Danessa Myricks Vision Cream Cover foundations 2 Juvia's Place eyeshadow palettes 3 LA Girl Shockwave Neon Liner 4 RCMA No-Color Powder 5 Any liquid lipstick really because I use them for so many different things. LL: What's your make-up pet peeve? SG:My biggest make-up pet peeve is incorrect foundation matching. This is what persons see first and if the undertone or shade is wrong it throws everything off. LL:Who/what inspires your art? SG:I am mainly inspired by past make-up trends from the 1930s to 1980s. Make-up in these eras was simple yet made a big impact and paved the way for all the current trends of today. I have a passion for editorial make-up and how much it says about the artist. Having an amazing support system is also extremely vital in my growth and development as an artist. Every day I am encouraged and reminded how talented I am by my friends and fellow MUAs. My true inspiration for what I do comes from, to name a few, Orville Spence, Vanessa Barrett, Rasine Hamilton and Teeah Anderson. LL: What is your legacy? SG:We all want to be remembered for something… I want to be remembered as a creative, an artist who used make-up to create art – someone who made a real difference. By choosing to focus primarily on editorial and avant-garde styles, I hope to [spark] the conversation in Jamaica about the art form. I hope for it to be at the forefront of the minds of those in the entertainment industry when considering promoting brand Jamaica in a fresh, innovative way. I hope for other young artists to embrace their passion and showcase their talents, not being afraid of how society will view their interpretation of life and just do what makes them happy. People sometimes consider things they don’t understand to be weird or wrong; art is about freedom of expression. CREDITS: Makeup Artist:Shenelle Gardner (@glamnelle) Photographer:Orville Spence (@10.06studio) Model (F):Shanique Singh (@queen.singh) Model (M):Tamichael Watson (@tamichaelx) See you next Friday! Cheek to Cheek Avant-Garde Make-up series is a celebration of Jamaican art through various forms of beauty. The series was conceptualised and produced by Kadeem Rodgers and Shawn Barnes. The purpose of the series is to showcase six up-and-coming Jamaican make-up artistes, who have presented their interpretations of avant-garde artistry each week. These alluring images were intended to provoke thought and spark conversations on the myriad interpretations of Jamaican beauty. What comes to mind when you think of Jamaican Avant-Garde?


Two scientists from the University of the West Indies (UWI) have been appointed to the InternationalScience Council to provide expertise for Small Island Developing States. The UWI said in a statement thatProfessor Terrence Forrester and Dr Michelle Mycoo have recently been appointed to the International Science Council (ISC). In an announcement made by the ISC earlier this month, the two were named among eight distinguished scientists selected from around the world, who will comprise a Small Island Development States (SIDS) Liaison Committee. According to the ISC, the Committee will advise on strategic matters, such as mobilizing input from the SIDS scientific community for the UN Decade of Ocean Science in Sustainable Development. The members are also expected to bring other matters to the attention of the ISC so that representation of the SIDS scientific community is strengthened across the Council’s activities. Professor Terrence Forrester is currently Chief Scientist for UWI SODECO (Solutions for Developing Countries) and a Professor of Experimental Medicine in the Faculty of Medical Sciences at The UWI, Mona Campus. As a clinical scientist with a longstanding interest in cardiovascular disease—primarily hypertension—he is renowned for his work with, and dedication to tropical medical research. Dr Michelle Mycoo is a Professor of Urban and Regional Planning at UWI,St. Augustine Campus. As an urban planning expert, her work, recognised regionally and internationally is dedicated to pivotal inter-related issues such as land use planning, climate change adaptation, disaster risk reduction, water management and integrated coastal zone planning. Their appointments are until December 31, 2021 in the first instance, and will then be reviewed for renewal. They will meet with other members virtually during the period and updates on the Committee’s activities will be shared with other ISC members and via the ISC’s website. The UWI said it continues to intensify its efforts at leveraging its inter-disciplinary research and scientific expertise on the unique issues faced by SIDS to address the multi-dimensional development challenges facing the Caribbean. 'The appointment and commitment of Professor Forrester and Dr Mycoo are testament to this effort.' 'Earlier this year, the world’s most reputable ranking agency, Times Higher Education recognised The UWI in its ‘Impact Rankings 2020’ which maps how universities are responding to the world’s biggest concerns, outlined in the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).' 'This is the only global performance table that assesses universities on their research, outreach and stewardship of the SDGs. Of the 768 universities on the table, The UWI ranked among the top 200 for its work on SDG3: Good Health and Wellbeing; SDG5: Gender Equality and SDG13: Climate Action.'

“WE RUN TINGS, TINGS NUH RUN WE.” When a Jamaican utters these wordswhile beating his chest and with his head held high, be afraid… Be very afraid. These words are a cry of greatness, a prediction of victory or a warning to clear the way. These words are profoundly echoed in the actions and achievements of our people. As the sun rises on Jamaica’s 58th anniversary of Independence, there are those who exuberantly celebrate the green, black and gold, belting ‘Jamaica, Land We Love’ and taking the pledge “Before God and all mankind…” Holding these symbols close as an affirmation of pride and progress. Others feel that true independence remains elusive… that when the shackles of colonialism were removed, a more sinister neo-colonialism moved in to take its place… and that independence from the former ‘mother country’ was merely conditional or perhaps even a lie. Irrespective of political or ideological leaning, one thing is for sure— Jamaicans are some of the most independent people in the world. Here are six indisputable reminders that Jamaicans run tings, tings nuh run we… Food Out of many, one food. Not only did Jamaicans create their national cuisine by perfectly blending influences from the Caribbean, Europe, Africa and Asia but they take it everywhere they go. Jamaican restaurants are so popular that you can almost find one anywhere in the world and sometimes several of them on the same street! See Church Avenue (also called Bob Marley Blvd) in Brooklyn, New York if you don’t believe me. Food in these restaurants is so popular that enterprising Jamaicans are now charging extra for oxtail gravy! But wait! There’s more. As if one identifiable cuisine wasn’t enough, Jamaicans pioneered another globally recognized cuisine called ital. Created by the Jamaican Rastafarian community, this natural way of preparing food focuses on eating what comes straight from the earth and does not include meat. Music Speaking of the great Robert Nesta Marley, Jamaican independence is evident in the invention and migration of many globally recognized Jamaican genres of music. From Mento to Dancehall… just imagine, the same country that gave the world Count Lasher also gave it Kartel… Jamaica releases new music at a prolific pace daily and Jamaican artists are among the most sampled in the world. The up-tempo feel of Ska reflected the nation’s mood after independence and Reggae music was birthed out of political strife and socio-economic hardship. Jamaican music has been used to lead revolutions and to broker peace. Jamaicans move to the beat of their own drum and when we find a rhythm we like, we make the world move to it as well. Fashion/ Style Mesh marina, diamond socks, Clarks, Buffalino, Romper, batty rider and pum pum shorts. Even if they aren’t made in Jamaica these items have all became synonymous with Jamaican culture and fashion. For Jamaicans, it’s not just WHAT you wear its HOW you wear it. Jamaican swag is undeniable, with iconic accessories to boot. ‘Kerchief or a back pocket rag are staples for the look. If you are wondering how influential the look is, look no further than runways in Milan or the latest music videos. Rastafarian Culture Of course the same people who created multiple genres of music would also be the originators of an entire faith and movement. Regarded as one of the fastest growing faiths/movements in history, Rastafari focuses on clean eating and living in unity with the earth with a pure mind and body. Rastafarians in Jamaica give the island a central role in the ideologies surrounding repatriation and reparations for people of African descent around the world. Rastafari has also influenced much of the music that the world embraces— transcending race, class and nationality via the tunes of artistes such as Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Dennis Brown, Bunny Wailer, Garnet Silk, Chronixx, Protege and Autarchii, who are all Rastafarians. Language The Honourable Louise Bennett-Coverley reminded us that Jamaican patois is not a corruption of the English language but is its own beautiful language, created by our ancestors with influences that reflect Jamaica’s colourful past. Our highly emotive and assertive native tongue is recognized and loved the world over… chat bout! Aside from our traditional patois, the revolving door of Jamaican slang finds its way into global pop culture and even into the every day vernacular of cities around the world. Visit the party scene in Toronto and you’ll hear Canadians using the word bashment or the lads in England referring to themselves as rude bwoys. Dance Jamaicans export dance moves the way that the Japanese export cars. No doubt, Jamaicans love to dance, but creating, innovating and promoting dance moves has become its own industry and has proven to be quite lucrative for Jamaicans with nimble feet. The late Gerald Levy aka “Bogle” helped to make dancing synonymous with dancehall and paved the way for today’s dancers who teach foreigners the latest moves or even “fly out” on their own dancing tours around the world. International dance choreography and music videos are littered with dance moves created by Jamaicans in Jamaica. With social media as their platform, artists such as Ding Dong and the Ravers Clavers dance crew have ensured that this Jamaican dance trend is not just a passing fad. {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/RuQifNefeWw.jpg?itok=Gd-5fRpA","video_url":"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuQifNefeWw","settings":{"responsive":1,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":1},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (Responsive, autoplaying)."]} Ravers Clavers vibing to "Trending" by Squash If you remove the political lens it is not hard to see that this land we call Jamaica and all of her beautiful people have always had an independent spirit— forged by our interactions with other nationalities, our unique geography and through a variety of unique historical circumstances. Every Jamaican— home and abroad— is a part of the patchwork that makes the quilt of “Jamaicanness” that blankets the globe. “Wi likkle but wi talawah, yuh zeet.”


Protoje's second release and video off his upcoming album,In Search of Lost Time, featuresdancehall star Popcaan. "Like Royalty," produced by Ziah and Winta James, tells Protoje’s story of struggle to triumph and highlights the people in his life who have helped him along the way. In addition to Popcaan, the Storm Saulter directed visual has cameos from In.Digg.Nation Collective artists’ Sevana and Lila Iké and its affiliate Jaz Elise. "The song is about letting my people know that as long as I’m healthy and strong, they have nothing to worry about,” Protoje says. “Popcaan was the only person I would have featured on this song - it was him or nobody. I knew his voice would be the perfect compliment and I think he is a great songwriter and storyteller so it was awesome to hear him tell his story about where he came from,” he said. Popcaan was happy to collaborate on the song. He said: "Me always a represent for the ghetto youths and want them to strive in life so this is just one of them song we push that message. Nuff struggles we go through but we make it out and we a live like royalty." Protoje's upcoming album, his fifth studio album is on the heels of his first GRAMMY nomination for Best Reggae Album in 2019 for A Matter Of Time, his first riddim production Rock & Groove, a recent guest feature on Alicia Keys' "Underdog" remix and a major label record deal partnership with his label and artist management company In.Digg.Nation Collective and RCA Records in 2020. Protoje from Like Royalty video. Photo: Storm Saulter In Search of Lost Time is a pivotal moment of reflection for Protoje. While he has enjoyed independent success that yielded international fanfare for over a decade, Protoje’s latest studio effort takes a deep look at his personal and professional evolution as a man, a father, and an artist. The title itself is an homage to the early 1900s Marcel Proust french novel about remembering the past. The forthcoming album is a marked departure from his previous releases and showcases a wider range of collaborations with balanced display of musicianship. The "reggae revival" contemporary colors outside the lines for a cinematic, multi-genre, stadium level LP. Hip Hop and reggae has always heavily influenced his sound, but he raises the bar by merging these two worlds with a variety of key players on both sides. {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/WFxyPB_LcBA.jpg?itok=vLUIxIEx","video_url":"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFxyPB_LcBA","settings":{"responsive":1,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":0},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (Responsive)."]} Protoje co-produces many of the tracks, and he also taps Supa Dups (the multi-platinum producer behind timeless songs for Drake, Bruno Mars, Nicki Minaj and John Legend), his resident beatsmith Winta James, Jamaica’s go-to hit-maker Stephen “Di Genius” McGregor and more. Vocalists from Wiz Khalifa, Koffee, Popcaan and Lila Iké also join in on this razor-sharp diverse 10-track release. Protoje shared the album's first reveal "Same So," on July 16. In Search of Lost Time is available for pre-order today, August 6and will be released worldwide on August 28via In.Digg.Nation Collective / Six Course / RCA Records.

Viola Davis arrives at The Hollywood Reporter's Women in Entertainment Breakfast on Dec. 5, 2018, in Los Angeles.  (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File

Viola Davis, Sterling K. Brown and LeBron James are among several honorees at the AAFCA TV Honors later this month. The African American Film Critics Association announced the recipients of the second annual event on Wednesday. The virtual ceremony is scheduled to air on Aug. 22. Comedian-actress Aida Rodriguez will host the invitation-only streamed event. “In a time of such uncertainty, we have witnessed how powerful the medium of television and streaming is," said Gil Robertson, co-founder and president of AAFCA. “We couldn’t be more proud to honour shows and performances that uplift and inspire at a time when we all need entertainment the most." Davis will be honoured for best actress for her role on ABC’s “How To Get Away with Murder.” Brown will receive best actor recognition for his character on NBC’s “This Is Us.” Kenya Barris will be presented the TV Icon award for his contributions to television with his creating of ABC’s “black-ish” and “#blackAF” on Netflix. Rashida Jones will present him the award. “I Promise” will receive the AAFCA’s inaugural award for the best short film. The documentary series on Quibi chronicled the first year of James launching the I Promise School in his hometown of Akron, Ohio. HBO’s “Insecure” will take home the comedy award, while Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson’s “For Life” was given best drama.


File photo.

Russia boasts that it's about to become the first country to approve a COVID-19 vaccine, with mass vaccinations planned as early as October using shots that are yet to complete clinical trials -- and scientists worldwide are sounding the alarm that the headlong rush could backfire. Moscow sees a Sputnik-like propaganda victory, recalling the Soviet Union's launch of the world's first satellite in 1957. But the experimental COVID-19 shots began first-in-human testing on a few dozen people less than two months ago, and there's no published scientific evidence yet backing Russia's late entry to the global vaccine race, much less explaining why it should be considered a front-runner. "I'm worried that Russia is cutting corners so that the vaccine that will come out may be not just ineffective, but also unsafe," said Lawrence Gostin, a global public health law expert at Georgetown University. "It doesn't work that way. Trials come first. That's really important." According to Kirill Dmitriev, head of Russia's Direct Investment Fund that bankrolled the effort, a vaccine developed by the Gamaleya research institute in Moscow may be approved in days, before scientists complete what's called a Phase 3 study. That final-stage study, usually involving tens of thousands of people, is the only way to prove if an experimental vaccine is safe and really works. Health Minister Mikhail Murashko said members of "risk groups," such as medical workers, may be offered the vaccine this month. He didn't clarify whether they would be part of the Phase 3 study that is said to be completed after the vaccine receives "conditional approval." Deputy Prime Minister Tatyana Golikova promised to start "industrial production" in September, and Murashko said mass vaccination may begin as early as October. Dr Anthony Fauci, the top US infectious disease specialist, questioned the fast-track approach last week. "I do hope that the Chinese and the Russians are actually testing a vaccine before they are administering the vaccine to anyone, because claims of having a vaccine ready to distribute before you do testing I think is problematic at best," he said. Questions about this vaccine candidate come after the US, Britain and Canada last month accused Russia of using hackers to steal vaccine research from Western labs. Delivering a vaccine first is a matter of national prestige for the Kremlin as it tries to assert the image of Russia as a global power capable of competing with the US and China. The notion of being "the first in the world" dominated state news coverage of the effort, with government officials praising reports of the first-step testing. In April, President Vladimir Putin ordered state officials to shorten the time of clinical trials for a variety of drugs, including potential coronavirus vaccines. According to Russia's Association of Clinical Trials Organizations, the order set "an unattainable bar" for scientists who, as a result, "joined in on the mad race, hoping to please those at power." The association first raised concern in late May, when professor Alexander Gintsburg, head of the Gamaleya institute, said he and other researchers tried the vaccine on themselves. The move was a "crude violation of the very foundations of clinical research, Russian law and universally accepted international regulations" the group said in an open letter to the government, urging scientists and health officials to adhere to clinical research standards. But a month later, the Health Ministry authorized clinical trials of the Gamaleya product, with what appeared to be another ethical issue. Human studies started June 17 among 76 volunteers. Half were injected with a vaccine in liquid form and the other half with a vaccine that came as soluble powder. Some in the first half were recruited from the military, which raised concerns that servicemen may have been pressured to participate. Some experts said their desire to perform well would affect the findings. "It's no coincidence media reports we see about the trials among the military said no one had any side effects, while the (other group) reported some," said Vasily Vlassov, a public health expert with Moscow's Higher School of Economics. As the trials were declared completed and looming regulatory approval was announced last week, questions arose about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness. Government assurances the drug produced the desired immune response and caused no significant side effects were hardly convincing without published scientific data describing the findings. The World Health Organization said all vaccine candidates should go through full stages of testing before being rolled out. "There are established practices and there are guidelines out," WHO spokesman Christian Lindmeier said Tuesday. "Between finding or having a clue of maybe having a vaccine that works, and having gone through all the stages, is a big difference." Offering an unsafe compound to medical workers on the front lines of the outbreak could make things worse, Georgetown's Gostin said, adding: "What if the vaccine started killing them or making them very ill?" Vaccines that are not properly tested can cause harm in many ways — from a negative impact on health to creating a false sense of security or undermining trust in vaccinations, said Thomas Bollyky, director of the global health program at the Council on Foreign Relations. "It takes several years to develop any drug," said Svetlana Zavidova, executive director of Russia's Association of Clinical Trials Organizations. "Selling something the Gamaleya (institute) tested on 76 volunteers during Phase 1-2 trials as a finished product is just not serious." Russia has not yet published any scientific data from its first clinical trials. The WHO's list of vaccine candidates in human testing still lists the Gamaleya product as in Phase 1 trials. It uses a different virus -- the common cold-causing adenovirus -- that's been modified to carry genes for the "spike" protein that coats the coronavirus, as a way to prime the body to recognize if a real COVID-19 infection comes along. That's similar to vaccines being developed by China's CanSino Biologics and Britain's Oxford University and AstraZeneca. It's not the first controversial vaccine Russia developed. Putin mentioned earlier this year that Russian scientists delivered an Ebola vaccine that "proved to be the most effective in the world" and "made a real contribution to fighting the Ebola fever in Africa." Russia's Health Ministry authorized two Ebola vaccines for domestic use -- one in 2015 and another one in 2018 -- but there is little evidence either was widely used in Africa. In 2019, the WHO considered the 2015 vaccine along with several others for use in Congo, but didn't pick it. It pointed out that it had been approved for emergency use after Phase 1 and 2 trials, but not Phase 3. According to ClinicalTrials.Gov, a website maintained by the US National Institutes of Health, a study among 2,000 people in Guinea and Russia was still ongoing last month. The 2018 Ebola vaccine, according to the WHO, was tested on 300 volunteers in Russia and completed all three phases. The Associated Press couldn't find any records of the studies in the Health Ministry's registry of approved clinical trials. As of 2019, both Ebola vaccines were listed by the WHO as "candidate vaccines." Russia's Health Ministry did not respond to numerous requests for comment, and the Gamaleya institute referred an interview request to the ministry. It remains unclear whether Phase 3 trials, said to be carried out after the COVID-19 vaccine receives "conditional approval," will wrap up by October, when health officials plan to start mass vaccinations, and how trustworthy the results will be. The study will supposedly involve 1,600 participants — 800 for each of the two forms of the vaccine; in comparison, a similar Phase 3 trial in the US includes 30,000 people. According to Dmitriev, countries including Brazil and India have expressed interest in the vaccine. For Lawrence Gostin, this is another cause for concern. "There may be many people in the world who don't care about the ethics and just want the vaccine," he said.

President Donald Trump pumps his fist as he finishes speaking during an event at the Whirlpool Corporation facility in Clyde, Ohio, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

President Donald Trump on Thursday ordered an unspecified ban on “transactions” with the Chinese owners of the consumer apps TikTok and WeChat, although it remains unclear if he has the legal authority to actually ban the apps from the U.S. The twin executive orders — one for each app — take effect in 45 days. They call on the Commerce Secretary to define the banned transactions by that time. The orders' wording is vague, but leaves open the possibility that hosting the apps in the Apple and Google app stores could be covered by the ban. Trump had threatened a deadline of Sept. 15 to “close down” TikTok unless Microsoft or another company bought it. TikTok, Microsoft and WeChat owner Tencent had no immediate replies to queries. “This is an unprecedented use of presidential authority,” Eurasia Group analyst Paul Triolo said in an email. At a minimum, he said, the orders appear to "constitute a ban on the ability of U.S. app stores run by Apple and Google to include either mobile app after 45 days.” Triolo said it’s possible the orders would face legal challenges and warned that Beijing is likely to “react harshly at least rhetorically.” Trump’s orders cited legal authority from the International Emergency Economic Powers Act and the National Emergencies Act. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Wednesday that he was expanding the U.S. crackdown on Chinese technology to personal apps, citing alleged security threats and calling out TikTok and WeChat by name. The order doesn't seem to ban Americans from using TikTok, said Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame. She added that such an order would be nearly impossible to enforce in the first place. “If the goal is to get teenagers to stop using TikTok, I’m not sure an executive order will stop them,” she said. “Every teenager knows how to use a VPN (a virtual private network). They will just pretend they are in Canada.” TikTok is a video-sharing app that's widely popular among young people in the U.S. and elsewhere. It is owned by the Chinese company ByteDance, which operates a separate version for the Chinese market. TikTok insists it does not store U.S. user information in China and would not share it with the Chinese government. WeChat and its sister app Weixin in China are hugely popular messaging apps; many Chinese expatriates use WeChat to stay in touch with friends and family back home WeChat also says it doesn’t share data with the Chinese government and never has, and does not store international user data in China. U.S. user data is stored in Canada. The order against Tencent could have ramifications for users beyond WeChat, which is crucial for personal communications and organizations that do business with China. Tencent also owns parts or all of the major game companies like Epic Games, publisher of Fortnite, a major video game hit, and Riot Games, which is behind League of Legends.


Los Angeles Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma (0) takes a backward shot against the Houston Rockets during the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Kim Klement/Pool Photo via AP).

The LeBron James-less Los Angeles Lakers fell to another NBA loss, while Giannis Antetokounmpo starred again on Thursday. Without James (groin), the Lakers suffered a second straight loss, beaten by the Houston Rockets 113-97. James Harden led the way for the Rockets with 39 points on 11-of-19 shooting, while the guard also had 12 assists and eight rebounds at the Walt Disney World Resort. In James' absence, Anthony Davis had a double-double of 17 points and 12 rebounds for the Lakers. Coming off back-to-back losses, the Milwaukee Bucks clinched the top seed in the Eastern Conference by beating the Miami Heat 130-116. The Bucks recovered from a 23-point deficit to bounce back, with Antetokounmpo finishing with 33 points and 12 rebounds. Khris Middleton also posted 33 points for Milwaukee. Leonard, Lillard in form Kawhi Leonard had 29 points as the Los Angeles Clippers eased past the Dallas Mavericks 126-111. Damian Lillard hit 11 three-pointers in a 45-point haul to lead the Portland Trail Blazers to a 125-115 win over the Denver Nuggets. A career-high 35 points from Bogdan Bogdanovic guided the Sacramento Kings to a 140-125 success against the New Orleans Pelicans. Cook can't take chance Quinn Cook was unable to make the most of his start for the Lakers. The guard went two-of-12 from the field for just six points in 29 minutes. Thursday's results Sacramento Kings 140-125 New Orleans Pelicans Milwaukee Bucks 130-116 Miami Heat Phoenix Suns 114-99 Indiana Pacers Los Angeles Clippers 126-111 Dallas Mavericks Portland Trail Blazers 125-115 Denver Nuggets Houston Rockets 113-97 Los Angeles Lakers

Arsenal's Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang poses with the trophy after the FA Cup final against Chelsea at Wembley stadium in London, England, Saturday, Aug.1, 2020. (Catherine Ivill/Pool via AP).

Arsenal star Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang's future has dominated headlines. With Aubameyang due to become a free agent in 2021, Arsenal have been desperate to re-sign the Gabon international. Now, it looks like the 31-year-old will remain at Emirates Stadium for an extended period. TOP STORY –AUBAMEYANG TO SIGN NEW DEAL Pierre-Emerick Aubameyangis close to signing a new three-year contract withArsenal, according to The Telegraph. Aubameyang's current deal is due to expire next year and the Arsenal star has been linked to LaLiga giantsBarcelona, as well as Ligue 1 championsParis Saint-Germain (PSG) andInter. But Aubameyang is set to sign a deal that will run until 2023, a two-year extension. ROUND-UP -Journalist Fabrizio Romano claims it is only a matter of time beforeWilliansigns a contract withArsenaluntil 2023. Chelsea midfielder Willian is free to talk to clubs as his deal at Stamford Bridge expires. The Gunners are also eyeingThomas Parteybut Atletico Madrid insist the midfielder will not leave unless his £45million(€50m) release clause is paid. -Paul Pogbais happy atManchester Unitedand is ready to sign a new contract, reports Romano. Pogba has been previously linked to former clubJuventusand LaLiga championsReal Madrid. -Staying at Old Trafford, and The Guardian claimsUnitedwill listen to offers forJesse Lingardas they try to priseJadon Sanchofrom Borussia Dortmund.United and Dortmund are still negotiating a transfer for Sancho, according to widespread reports. -Edinson Cavanicould be poised to join Brazilian outfitAtletico Mineiro, reports Globo Esporte. The 33-year-old Uruguay international is a free agent after leaving PSG. Cavani has been linked to Portuguese giantsBenfica, newly promoted Premier League teamLeeds United, MLS outfitInter Miami,Atletico,andInter. -Evertonare interested in signing Atletico'sThomas Lemar, says Le10Sport. Carlo Ancelotti's Everton are also hoping to bring United full-backDiego Dalotto Goodison Park, reports The Mirror. -According to The Athletic,Pierre-Emile Hojbjergis set to joinTottenhamfrom Southampton. Spurs will pay £19mfor the former Bayern Munich midfielder. -Liverpoolwill have to pay close to £20m for Norwich City left-backJamal Lewisafter the Premier League champions had a £10m offer rejected, says The Guardian. -David Silvalooks set to move toLazio. According to Sky Sport Italia, the Manchester City midfielder – a free agent – will swap the Premier League for Serie A following the club's Champions League campaign.