St Joseph's Convent

St Joseph's Convent is an all-girls Roman Catholic secondary school. Initially located in the city of Castries, after a fire on August 30, 1959, it was relocated to the present building at Cedars Road, Castries. The institution prides itself in providing a moral and Christian environment in which each young girl’s talents are enhanced and each feels a sense of worth, community and responsibility. Guided by professional teachers who act as mentors, the girls are exposed to a series of development activities which fosters creative thinking and a sense of togetherness. Although known nationally for producing some of the island’s best academic performers, the students do enjoy some downtime which allows them to create lifelong memories with each other. You may not identify with all the memories listed below, but if you attended St Joseph’s Convent in the last 20 years there should beat least a few that you will recall fondly. Sister Claire – She was the uniform inspector. Always making sure the girls’ uniforms were at the correct lengths. She was also the owner of ‘The Tickler’ which was the belt she used to punish misbehaving students. Mr Felicien – All students were nervous when he was on stage at assembly. Famous for calling students ‘dotish’, everyone was hoping not to be called out and embarrassed in front of the entire school. Mr Savy – He was obsessed and passionate about Mathematics The smell of dirty socks in the AV room Ms Johnson Laurie – She was nicknamed ‘scratch and sniff’. If you know, you know. The sacred grass – Students were not allowed to walk on the grass Sitting on the floor – Although many regard convent girls as being ‘stuck up’, it was part of Convent culture and tradition to sit on the floor. Elocution Competition – During the first three years at St Joseph’s Convent every girl would look forward to the competition, which was fun yet competitive. SJC steel orchestra – This was one of the signature things about the school. The girls were exposed to learning to play different instruments while appreciating various genres of music. They also enjoyed the opportunity of performing across the island and bonding with each other. Some of the girls who were part of the band are still friends after leaving the school. There was a theme for every assembly Tasty dhals from Miss Baba Annual Calypso Competition – Where there was music, there was SJC. Every student looked forward to the calypso competition. There was always at least one calypso which was filled with harmony that had students singing all year long. There was one time a student sang about bomb scares which occurred very often during that year. Sister Rufina – She was strict. Students tried to not get into trouble for fear of getting a serious lashing from her STEC Club – Every girl wanted to be part of this environmental club to wear the cute uniforms with the tie Sister Annanciata – In cookery, she used to spray all the food MrsDestangalways sleeping in Geography class Float and ketchup - This was a Convent thing. Every girl has had one of these from the canteen. The Carnival Princess show – The level of competition for this show was always stiff but the girls always had a wonderful time House competitions Cheese paste sandwiches from the canteen

St Aublyn 'Captain' Kidd mixes his way to the top. (Photos: Contributed)

As a youngster growing up in Seaview Gardens – that many refer to as one of Jamaica’s talent factories – St Aublyn ‘Captain’ Kidd’s first business idea was owning an airport. Kidd had the drive to achieve these goals, but challenges made him rethink his goals, which was when he discovered mixology – which he believes are ‘more realistic dreams’. Though the 33-year-old has never fully abandoned his aspirations, he found his passion pursuing a career in mixology, with growing popularity in corporate and entertainment circles. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Captain St Aublyn Kidd (@captainmixokidd) on Jun 3, 2020 at 3:37pm PDT ‘Companies like Red Stripe/Heineken have contacted me for my services just as often as individuals book me for private events. While I am continuing to work on the lifelong dream of being an entrepreneur, I am also investing in my talent and pursuing my goals as a mixologist,’ Kidd told Loop Lifestyle. ‘As the epicurean culture evolves in Jamaica, I know the culinary scene will expand [too] and provide me with a larger platform to grow locally and internationally.’ Where it all began According to the ‘Captain’, his interest in mixology started while working in food and beverage, where he naturally caught on to cocktail recipes. Books, the internet, seminars, drinking on the job, and taking personal notes from the Swiss-trained food and beverage guru and business owner Sean Gonzales, were the tools Kidd needed to develop his career in mixology. ‘Mr Gonzales was an important mentor in my career in earlier years; I quickly excelled in the company where I trained staff and became the human resources/research and development manager and on-site event supervisor. View this post on Instagram What's the Captain up to Next?? A post shared by Captain St Aublyn Kidd (@captainmixokidd) on Jul 12, 2020 at 11:11am PDT Over time, I studied all the liquors and learned most of the myths and stories about the trade and the tools. ‘In 2010, I won the International Bartending Competition’. Two years later Kidd was granted the opportunity to travel to the United States for the first time to judge the New York leg of the same competition. He confessed that the ability to create great tasting drinks while entertaining and providing excellent customer service are among the most difficult aspects of the job; but points to his love of showmanship and seeing customers’ reactions after tasting his mixes, as motivators. Mixology vs Bartending Known for his eclectic presentation style, the ‘Captain’ noted that there is a difference between bartending and mixology. ‘If you think about the word mixology as an umbrella for ‘the study of cocktails’, then a mixologist is someone devoted to that study. A bartender is someone that works and tends to guests behind a bar. Kidd believes ‘a bartender can be a mixologist, but a mixologist does not necessarily need to be a bartender’. This is a topic of debate in the spirits community because the word mixologist was created to elevate the profession, but, Kidd is of the opinion that ‘it never needed elevating’. He asserted that ‘mixologists create and serve drinks, bartenders serve people.’ What’s next? Kidd’s immediate goal is to elevate mixology in Jamaica and to have more people respect the craft and skills of his profession. ‘I personally want to open a restaurant that is also a school so that I can play my part in growing the profession.’ ‘I see ‘Captain Kidd’ as a global brand doing exclusive events, home bartender training, securing international brand opportunities and also representing non-liquor brands.’ Right now, I aim to do more local partnerships similar to what I have in the pipeline with Red Stripe, to showcase the profession. He’s currently working on a mixology series with Red Stripe to show the versatility of beer.


Former Minister in the Ministry of Natural Resources, Simona Broomes. Photo: Ministry of Natural Resources/Simona Broomes

“You wicked! You wicked boy!” were the screams of a former Government Minister in Guyana as she confronted two men, who allegedly threatened to kill her earlier today. In a Facebook live stream, Simona Broomes, the former Minister in the Ministry of Natural Resources, detailed that she was accosted by a young man after he removed no fishing signs near her home in the capital city Georgetown. She said the Afro-Guyanese man told her “we in power now.” A visibly distraught Broomes trailed the man, who was picked up by two other men in a white Toyota car with the license plate PYY 5565, to the Sophia district where she and some armed associates confronted two of the three suspects when they were dropped off. It was during the melee that she discovered one of the men was a childhood associate of hers. “Me! Your schoolmate boy! You could’ve come and kill me. Look what you all turned too,” Broomes stated. “Just like that they could have come and kill and murder me and you would have heard something else. These things are very dangerous to your life. I sat down as a minister of Government and I did nothing but serve the people.” She continued: “This is where we are going? You swear in a President yesterday and this is how you are coming to provoke people?” “Is war you all start,” Broomes screamed as she and the mob dealt the men several blows. She noted previous threats were reported to the police but no action was taken.

St Aublyn 'Captain' Kidd mixes his way to the top. (Photos: Contributed)

As a youngster growing up in Seaview Gardens – that many refer to as one of Jamaica’s talent factories – St Aublyn ‘Captain’ Kidd’s first business idea was owning an airport. Kidd had the drive to achieve these goals, but challenges made him rethink his goals, which was when he discovered mixology – which he believes are ‘more realistic dreams’. Though the 33-year-old has never fully abandoned his aspirations, he found his passion pursuing a career in mixology, with growing popularity in corporate and entertainment circles. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Captain St Aublyn Kidd (@captainmixokidd) on Jun 3, 2020 at 3:37pm PDT ‘Companies like Red Stripe/Heineken have contacted me for my services just as often as individuals book me for private events. While I am continuing to work on the lifelong dream of being an entrepreneur, I am also investing in my talent and pursuing my goals as a mixologist,’ Kidd told Loop Lifestyle. ‘As the epicurean culture evolves in Jamaica, I know the culinary scene will expand [too] and provide me with a larger platform to grow locally and internationally.’ Where it all began According to the ‘Captain’, his interest in mixology started while working in food and beverage, where he naturally caught on to cocktail recipes. Books, the internet, seminars, drinking on the job, and taking personal notes from the Swiss-trained food and beverage guru and business owner Sean Gonzales, were the tools Kidd needed to develop his career in mixology. ‘Mr Gonzales was an important mentor in my career in earlier years; I quickly excelled in the company where I trained staff and became the human resources/research and development manager and on-site event supervisor. View this post on Instagram What's the Captain up to Next?? A post shared by Captain St Aublyn Kidd (@captainmixokidd) on Jul 12, 2020 at 11:11am PDT Over time, I studied all the liquors and learned most of the myths and stories about the trade and the tools. ‘In 2010, I won the International Bartending Competition’. Two years later Kidd was granted the opportunity to travel to the United States for the first time to judge the New York leg of the same competition. He confessed that the ability to create great tasting drinks while entertaining and providing excellent customer service are among the most difficult aspects of the job; but points to his love of showmanship and seeing customers’ reactions after tasting his mixes, as motivators. Mixology vs Bartending Known for his eclectic presentation style, the ‘Captain’ noted that there is a difference between bartending and mixology. ‘If you think about the word mixology as an umbrella for ‘the study of cocktails’, then a mixologist is someone devoted to that study. A bartender is someone that works and tends to guests behind a bar. Kidd believes ‘a bartender can be a mixologist, but a mixologist does not necessarily need to be a bartender’. This is a topic of debate in the spirits community because the word mixologist was created to elevate the profession, but, Kidd is of the opinion that ‘it never needed elevating’. He asserted that ‘mixologists create and serve drinks, bartenders serve people.’ What’s next? Kidd’s immediate goal is to elevate mixology in Jamaica and to have more people respect the craft and skills of his profession. ‘I personally want to open a restaurant that is also a school so that I can play my part in growing the profession.’ ‘I see ‘Captain Kidd’ as a global brand doing exclusive events, home bartender training, securing international brand opportunities and also representing non-liquor brands.’ Right now, I aim to do more local partnerships similar to what I have in the pipeline with Red Stripe, to showcase the profession. He’s currently working on a mixology series with Red Stripe to show the versatility of beer.


St Aublyn 'Captain' Kidd mixes his way to the top. (Photos: Contributed)

As a youngster growing up in Seaview Gardens – that many refer to as one of Jamaica’s talent factories – St Aublyn ‘Captain’ Kidd’s first business idea was owning an airport. Kidd had the drive to achieve these goals, but challenges made him rethink his goals, which was when he discovered mixology – which he believes are ‘more realistic dreams’. Though the 33-year-old has never fully abandoned his aspirations, he found his passion pursuing a career in mixology, with growing popularity in corporate and entertainment circles. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Captain St Aublyn Kidd (@captainmixokidd) on Jun 3, 2020 at 3:37pm PDT ‘Companies like Red Stripe/Heineken have contacted me for my services just as often as individuals book me for private events. While I am continuing to work on the lifelong dream of being an entrepreneur, I am also investing in my talent and pursuing my goals as a mixologist,’ Kidd told Loop Lifestyle. ‘As the epicurean culture evolves in Jamaica, I know the culinary scene will expand [too] and provide me with a larger platform to grow locally and internationally.’ Where it all began According to the ‘Captain’, his interest in mixology started while working in food and beverage, where he naturally caught on to cocktail recipes. Books, the internet, seminars, drinking on the job, and taking personal notes from the Swiss-trained food and beverage guru and business owner Sean Gonzales, were the tools Kidd needed to develop his career in mixology. ‘Mr Gonzales was an important mentor in my career in earlier years; I quickly excelled in the company where I trained staff and became the human resources/research and development manager and on-site event supervisor. View this post on Instagram What's the Captain up to Next?? A post shared by Captain St Aublyn Kidd (@captainmixokidd) on Jul 12, 2020 at 11:11am PDT Over time, I studied all the liquors and learned most of the myths and stories about the trade and the tools. ‘In 2010, I won the International Bartending Competition’. Two years later Kidd was granted the opportunity to travel to the United States for the first time to judge the New York leg of the same competition. He confessed that the ability to create great tasting drinks while entertaining and providing excellent customer service are among the most difficult aspects of the job; but points to his love of showmanship and seeing customers’ reactions after tasting his mixes, as motivators. Mixology vs Bartending Known for his eclectic presentation style, the ‘Captain’ noted that there is a difference between bartending and mixology. ‘If you think about the word mixology as an umbrella for ‘the study of cocktails’, then a mixologist is someone devoted to that study. A bartender is someone that works and tends to guests behind a bar. Kidd believes ‘a bartender can be a mixologist, but a mixologist does not necessarily need to be a bartender’. This is a topic of debate in the spirits community because the word mixologist was created to elevate the profession, but, Kidd is of the opinion that ‘it never needed elevating’. He asserted that ‘mixologists create and serve drinks, bartenders serve people.’ What’s next? Kidd’s immediate goal is to elevate mixology in Jamaica and to have more people respect the craft and skills of his profession. ‘I personally want to open a restaurant that is also a school so that I can play my part in growing the profession.’ ‘I see ‘Captain Kidd’ as a global brand doing exclusive events, home bartender training, securing international brand opportunities and also representing non-liquor brands.’ Right now, I aim to do more local partnerships similar to what I have in the pipeline with Red Stripe, to showcase the profession. He’s currently working on a mixology series with Red Stripe to show the versatility of beer.

In this Nov. 10, 2009 file photo, Bollywood superstar Amitabh Bachchan speaks during an interview in London. Bachchan was discharged from a Mumbai hospital on Sunday after undergoing two weeks of treatment for the coronavirus.(AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

Bollywood superstar Amitabh Bachchan was discharged from a Mumbai hospital on Sunday after undergoing three weeks of treatment for the coronavirus. His actor son, Abhishek Bachchan, who is still in the Nanavati Super Speciality Hospital with the virus, said in a tweet that his father has tested negative and will rest at home. Both were hospitalised on July 11. Abhishek Bachchan's wife, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, and their 8-year-old daughter, who both also contracted the virus, left the hospital last week after recovering. The elder Bachchan, 77, has acted in more than 200 Indian films over the past five decades. He is also a former politician and television host. The Bachchans are often called Bollywood's first family. Amitabh Bachchan's wife, Jaya, is also an actress and a one-time member of Parliament. She was not hit by the coronavirus.


Tara Abrahams’ Instagram post with the #challengeaccepted hashtag, joining female users across the world, who flooded the photo-sharing app with black-and-white images. The official goal: a show of support for other women. Abrahams, the philanthropic advisor from New York, added a caption encouraging people to check their voter registration status and make a plan to vote in November. (Tara Abrahams via AP)

‘Challenge accepted,’ they wrote — female Instagram users across the world, flooding the photo-sharing app with black-and-white images. Together they formed a grid of millions of magazine-style captures of celebrities, spur-of-the-moment selfies and filtered snaps from weddings or other special occasions. The official goal: A show of support for other women. An accompanying hashtag, #womensupportingwomen, often was the only sign of the campaign’s intent, along with friends’ Instagram handles to encourage participation. And some users quickly began to wonder: What’s the point? Jamaican entrepreneur Cecile Levee is among the women asking 'Why?' Rather,why not chart another narrative of 'tangible support'. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Cecile Levee (@cecilelevee) on Jul 24, 2020 at 11:11am PDT To some observers of social media activism, #challengeaccepted represents a clear example of ‘slacktivism’ — campaigns based on social platforms that require little effort of participants. There’s no donation requested, no volunteer shift required, just a few minutes to post a message or image that people are unlikely to fight over. They say photo-driven campaigns can become a powerful push for social change. But they feel this latest effort so far lacks a concrete goal. ‘Successful selfie protests made what’s invisible visible,’ said Mona Kasra, an assistant professor of digital media design at the University of Virginia. ‘They are effective when they shift public perception, when they create a counterculture, when they resist, when they claim a place online.’ By Thursday, more than six million Instagram posts had used the #challengeaccepted hashtag. Others just included the phrase ‘challenge accepted’ in their post, making it difficult to count total participation. Some participants praised the posts as a straightforward way for women to support one another — one that comes days after US Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s passionate speech on the House floor calling out sexist culture. Girls’ and women’s advocate Tara Abrahams joined the millions of women posting under the hashtag after a friend invited her to share. She chose a shot of herself smiling, her dark hair streaming across the square frame. Before posting it, the philanthropic adviser from New York added a caption encouraging people to check their voter registration status and make a plan to vote in November. ‘I just kept smiling because I saw these very inspiring women flood my feed,’ said Abrahams, who also chairs a non-profit focused on girls’ access to education in 11 other countries. ‘I know that there are real women doing the real work. Instagram can be where the activism begins, but it’s not where it ends.’ Some researchers are encouraged by the debate. They consider it a sign that many Americans’ expectations for social media communication have been honed by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and large demonstrations demanding change in US policing following the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and other Black Americans. Questions about this latest photo challenge also mirror reaction to the #blackoutTuesday push in early June, stemming from an effort within the music industry to halt normal operations for a day. Then, public attention focused on social media, where users posted all-black images on their Facebook or Instagram accounts as a show of support for the Black Lives Matter movement. Some posters backtracked after activists criticised the action, saying it was drowning out existing material already posted by Black users. The conversation about #challengeaccepted is further complicated by questions about its origin. Some social media users have tied it to ongoing work to raise awareness of women killed by their male partners in Turkey. But that link is difficult to trace definitively. An Instagram spokesman said posts in Turkey about violence against women date to the start of July, while the black-and-white aesthetic and accompanying #womensupportingwomen hashtag that flooded IG these past weeks first showed up in mid-July among users in Brazil before spreading to the United States. Stephanie Vie, an associate dean at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, said tracking the origins and changes in social media campaigns across countries and cultures is a constant struggle for researchers who study memes and other digital communication. Rather than ‘slacktivism,’ Vie prefers the umbrella term ‘digital activism’ — because, she says, shows of support on social media can indeed be meaningful. ‘Would I like #challengeaccepted to have more of an activist bent? Absolutely,’ Vie said. ‘Do I want to say people are doing it completely wrong and they shouldn’t bother posting? No, because you have to start somewhere.’ Activists who work on women’s rights internationally say they are encouraged by any effort to spotlight the cause. But they suggested this latest push would have more impact if participants went beyond a photo posting — perhaps by encouraging support for an organisation working on women’s rights. ‘It’s powerful, but it’s also helpful to see an action piece, like what am I fighting for?’ said Rosalyn Park, director of the Women’s Human Rights Program. ‘I would love to see people leverage that trending power and that momentum to really go one step further.’ Yet simply talking about the way digital movements work — or don’t work — can be a useful pursuit. The existence of any meaningful debate about a meme campaign focused on women is encouraging, says Katherine DeLuca, an assistant professor of English and communication at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Participants likely have good intentions, she says, but it’s healthy to consider what else they can do to support a broader goal. ‘People having the time to think critically about what they’re circulating in online spaces is a great place for us to be, especially going into an election season,’ DeLuca said. After Abrahams made her initial post, she took things a step further the next day by posting a second image: a black-and-white drawing of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman fatally shot by police in March during a drug investigation. Abrahams included a link to a petition demanding charges against officers involved. The warrant to search Taylor’s home was in connection with a suspect who did not live there and no drugs were found, making her death a recurring focus of protesters in the US this year. And with that #challengeaccepted follow-up, Abrahams tried to connect something widespread and unspecific to something that, for her, was focused and essential. ‘It’s OK to hold space for joy and for fun and for supporting one another,’ Abrahams said. ‘It’s OK to have all of those things as long as there’s real work.’

People wearing face masks ride motorcycles in Hanoi, Vietnam, Monday, Aug. 3, 2020. Vietnam has tightened travel and social restrictions after the country's death toll of COVID-19 to six. (AP Photo/Hau Dinh)

Vietnam has confirmed 21 more coronavirus cases linked to three hospitals in the central city of Da Nang, the health ministry said Monday. The country, which had lifted many restrictions after more than three months with no local infections, now has 196 cases in the new outbreak. Fifteen of the new cases were in Da Nang, Vietnam's most popular beach destination, while six others were in neighboring Quang Nam province. All were patients or relatives of patients at the three hospitals in Da Nang, where the outbreak emerged, the ministry said. Vietnam had been widely praised for its success in controlling its initial outbreak of the coronavirus, with no reported cases of local transmission for 99 days. But nine days ago, a case was confirmed at a Da Nang hospital. The virus has now spread to six parts of the country, including three large cities, forcing authorities to reimpose virus restrictions. Officials have confirmed three deaths, the country's first from the virus. The health ministry said 40% of the new cases show no symptoms. "The asymptomatic cases are a danger for transmission in the community," acting health minister Nguyen Thanh Long said. "Therefore, we must not overlook any suspected cases." On Monday, the army deployed a mobile lab truck to Da Nang to increase testing capacity in the city. During a government meeting on Monday, Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc urged all provinces to control the outbreak in early August, calling it a "crucial time." "Each family must be a fortress and each citizen must be a warrior to keep the outbreak from spreading widely in the community," Phuc said. He urged residents to be vigilant to help control the virus and ensure health security. But he said there shouldn't be a rush to close businesses because health should to be balanced with economic security.


Barbados senior men's team forward Hallam Hope

Despite the dark shadows casted over domestic sports by the COVID-19 virus, there has been a ray of sunshine beaming in the local football fraternity. Along with advancing to League B in the Concacaf Nations League, the national senior men’s team can boast of having European competition winners in their camp, with the likes of Thierry Gale, Nick Blackman and Hallam Hope all tasting success for their clubs. After five years of professional football, Hope captured his first career title, as he helped Swindon Town win the Sky Bet English Football League Two title. The former Everton FC graduate, joined Swindon Town in January after a three-year spell with Carlisle United, where he converted 25 times in 104 matches. [related node_id='3a3173e4-cba8-4816-8bde-69f7ee18364c'] A move Hope labeled as delayed, ashe hadexpected to transfer in last summer’s transfer window but a breakdown in negotiations prevented the 26-year-old forward from finalizingthe move. Hope stated there was some disappointment as he believed his time had expired at Carlisle and he needed a new challenge, plus Swindon’s playing style was very attractive and he can identify with their philosophy. Swindon Town returned for their man in January and Hope repaid their confidence with two goals in his first two home games against Port Vale and Exeter respectively. Hope said he wasvery pleased about the move and impressed with the quality of the environment. “We have a big squad of quality players at Swindon and the manager changes the team around quite often; he uses everyone. The training is of a high quality and that’s always going to be good for me”, said Hope. Just like his club debut for Swindon, Hope bagged two goals for the Tridents in his first outing back in 2018 versus Guyana in a 2-2 draw in Georgetown. Since then he has gone onto add two more goals, one of which helped Barbados defeat the Cayman Islands and advance to League B of the Concacaf Nations League. Hope labeled that goal as one of the most important ones in his career, since it not only earned his team the victory but it was in front the home crowd which included his family. Barbados face Guyana in their opening Concacaf Gold Cup qualifier, on a date to be announced and Hope is confident that his team can do the job and progress to the next round. “I feel really confident, I think we have a great player from overseas in Nick Blackman that we didn’t have in the game we drew with Guyana and I’m looking forward to it [the game]. Every time I come back to Barbados the boys have always improved quite significantly from the previous game. Coach Latapy has had a big effect, the training is a lot more organized and professional, so things are looking up at the moment for Barbados football”, Hope said. Hope extended congratulations to his European-based teammates and indicated that they will be bringing their experience, professionalism and winning mentality to the Tridents in an effort to reach the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup.

Arsenal's Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang scores his side's second goal during the FA Cup final  against Chelsea at Wembley stadium in London, England, Saturday, Aug. 1, 2020. (Adam Davy/Pool via AP).

Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang clinched a record-extending 14th FA Cup for Arsenal on Saturday, scoring twice in a 2-1 victory against Chelsea at an empty Wembley Stadium. Christian Pulisic had become the first American man to score in an FA Cup final but his fifth-minute opener was canceled out by Aubameyang's penalty in the 28th minute after he was dragged down by Chelsea captain Cesar Azpilicueta. A year into this pandemic-disrupted, longest-ever English season, Azpilicueta hobbled off injured in tears before halftime. Pulisic only lasted a minute after the break before also pulling up with an apparent hamstring injury. With Chelsea unsettled by the injuries, Arsenal took control and Aubameyang chipped goalkeeper Willy Caballero from close range in the 67th. It not only sealed Arsenal's fourth FA Cup in seven seasons. but a place in the Europa League, having only finished eighth in the Premier League. Chelsea's hopes of forcing the game into extra time were dealt a blow when Mateo Kovacic received a second yellow card in the 73rd after softly catching Granit Xhaka. Chelsea finished with nine men in stoppage time when Pedro was forced off with a shoulder injury.